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  Academic language  MartinY at 06:53 on 10 April 2011
 

This is a real quote from a real paper, (I will send the reference privately if anyone wants...)

...due to the logarithmic nature of pitch, frequency "errors" committed by the player are proportional to the desired frequency.

Several people have been unable to understand this??????? However in context it is not as bad as at first reading but it still a funny way of saying: the violins begin to get out of tune when they play high. If you do not believe this listen to any recording of the high bit in Strauss' Alpine Symphony.

  Re: Academic language  MartinY at 07:08 on 10 April 2011
 

Over the years I have had several people tell me my written language is not academic enough and also that it is inappropriate to give lectures in a Yorkshire accent, even when the lecture theatre happens to be in Yorkshire.

My latest incident was some editor, whose first language is clearly not English and his language is one which dispenses with all the little words which are so troublesome in English, wanted to convert my English to meerkatese. People from outside the UK might not understand this so I will explain......

The meerkat series of adverts is very popular and children have cuddly meerkat toys called 'Aexander' and there is always a big crowd of children around the meerkat enclosures at London and Chester saying 'simples'. The meerkats are supposed to have emigrated to Russia for a better life and fought in the Tsar's army against the mongooses (mongeese?). They speak a bizarre language which is a mixture of English and Russian and everytime something is going well they say 'simples'. I know from my editing that scientists from first languages which use synthesis rather than articles have strange ideas about the disposition of the little words and the adjectives and adverbs just like Alexander, so I called it meerkatese. The Russians living in London must be heartily fed up with these pretty clever adverts.



<Added>

Sorry I have misspelt Alexander