Login   Sign Up 
 


Latest Comps & Opps
18/9/14 ...

Site Search.


New Members
  musicswan (17/9)
  fjbeppe (14/9)
  JamesG (13/9)
  sonatina_3 (12/9)
  emafiddler (10/9)

   » Full C:T Members List


Other Resources
News Archive






Search Forums:
This 24 message thread spans 2 pages: [1]  2  > >  
  Overture to the Snow Goose  Sid Barnhoorn at 17:37 on 27 February 2007
 

Hello all,

My name is Siddhartha Barnhoorn. I'm a filmcomposer from The Netherlands but I also write comcertmusic for orchestra and other ensembles. My first performed orchestra piece "Overture to the Snow Goose" is online on my site. Unfortunately the recording is poor but it's there:

www.sidbarnhoorn.com

This piece is inspired by the book The Snow Goose by Paul Gallico. The overture is divided into 4 diffirent parts and eventually I want to compose a bigger work that's associated with the material in this overture. Tell me what you think. :-)

I mainly write for film, commercial and audio drama's at the moment but I'm also gonna work on some new concertworks soon, to experiment with compositiontechniques and write my "Dunes" sinfonia.

Cheers,
Siddhartha Barnhoorn
---------------------------------
Email:
info@sidbarnhoorn.com
AIM:
Sid Barnhoorn
MSN:
sidbarnhoorn@hotmail.com
Skype:
Sidbarnhoorn
Myspace:
www.myspace.com/sidbarnhoorn
Website:
www.sidbarnhoorn.com

  Re: Overture to the Snow Goose  James McFadyen at 06:43 on 28 February 2007
 

Hi Siddhartha

Welcome to CompositionToday.

I had a listen to "Overture to the Snow Goose".

Same old same old, heard it all before.

Orchestrations were poor and old-fashioned. The music lacked substance and originality. It was just too much like a film score and pretty much doubt a publisher would ever publish you (therefore you have no real sustainable career).

There are very few film composers who can really cater for the concert market and they are at the top of their game, for example, John Williams, and even he cannot beat the classical composers of this generation.

My advice is stick to film composition and accept the fact that you will never have originality. Leave that to the real composers.

Sorry for my tone, I don't believe in BS, I tell it the way it is.

  Re: Overture to the Snow Goose  Sid Barnhoorn at 07:07 on 28 February 2007
 

Hi James,

So, you got somekind of clairvoyance or something? Telling people you don't know how it's going to be for them? Don't get me wrong, I appreciate your honest opinion but it came across as abit arrogant.

Nevertheless, I should also have said that I'm still a student studying composition and much less doing selfstudies in orchestration and other things which until now has mostly still been studies by ear, still need to dive into the books. This was the first composition of mine which was accually going to be performed live. Had about 2 months to write it plus do my own orchestration and such.

It's good of you to point out the fact about orchestration. Gives me the drive to keep on studying it. As for composition, there's alot in there which is experimentation, with 12tone/serial techniques, polytonality and some other stuff. For me personally it was worth while. On to the next piece!

Thanks for your comments/critiques. I can take it, even if it's negatively toned, like yours but I only take what's helpful.

Cheers,
Siddhartha Barnhoorn
---------------------------------
Email:
info@sidbarnhoorn.com
AIM:
Sid Barnhoorn
MSN:
sidbarnhoorn@hotmail.com
Skype:
Sidbarnhoorn
Myspace:
www.myspace.com/sidbarnhoorn
Website:
www.sidbarnhoorn.com

  Re: Overture to the Snow Goose  red5 at 17:43 on 28 February 2007
 

'You have no real sustainable carrer'?! That's a bit harsh isn't it?

Surely film composers make most of their money from film deals not being published? And i know composers who have publishing deals but struggle and some who don't that are flying. A publisher is not the be all and end all!

  Re: Overture to the Snow Goose  piargno at 05:40 on 01 March 2007
 

"My advice is stick to film composition and accept the fact that you will never have originality."

Schoenberg, Stockhausen, and Beethoven were probably told this a bunch of times. Hehe! Look at their early pieces!!!

For some reason, your website is not working on my computer. I'll try the link somewhere else, and then give you a critique that at least has both respect and honesty.

  Re: Overture to the Snow Goose  John Robertson at 10:32 on 01 March 2007
 

I can take it, even if it's negatively toned, like yours but I only take what's helpful.

Sid I like your attitude - my favourite quote from Einstein is that he said something like I'm not a genius I just stick at the problem longer - a refusal to be put off my harsh critism is one feature of an original mind in my book.

  Re: Overture to the Snow Goose  Sid Barnhoorn at 11:52 on 05 March 2007
 

Thanks guys,

Sorry about that btw, the server was down. It's working again now! :-)

Cheers,
Sid

  Re: Overture to the Snow Goose  piargno at 05:55 on 06 March 2007
 

Heard the Overture.

Honestly - wonderful job, especially for unfamiliar territory, and the fact that you're still a student. But quite honestly, some of my fellow classmates couldn't write an orchestral piece this good.

At any rate, the proportions are a bit off... it's a bit too long. The movement at the end does not quite balance the static music of the beginning. And be careful not to overuse percussion. I would add a hint more percussion in the begining, and back off at the end. Also, some of the solos in the weak winds (bassoon solo) in thick accompanying textures do not work, so think about doubling. Also, think about muting strings, sul tasto playing, and also brass mutes. Your dynamic contrast is good, but dynamic contrasts doubled with color/timbre contrasts are even better. Read Schoenberg's views about timbre being structurally functional. This will help.

Last but not least, I'm always impressed by solo string groups in orchestral pieces. I bet this overture could benefit a lot from a solo string. Or perhaps the piece has it, but I didn't hear it right. I listened to this piece in the background of doing a lot of other things... I'm way too busy and stressed out right now.

Honestly, by James's tone, I was expecting something atrocious. You've got a lot of talent. Honestly.

  Re: Overture to the Snow Goose  Sid Barnhoorn at 21:16 on 06 March 2007
 

Hi Anthony,

Thanks for your comments! They help a great deal. I'm glad you like the work and indeed I need to work on balance. Good idea about doubling and such, thanks! I'm currently also doing a selfstudy in the book The Study of Orchestration by Adler. I think that'll help a great deal as well.

Anyway, thanks for listening and giving your comments!

Cheers,
Siddhartha Barnhoorn
---------------------------------
Email:
info@sidbarnhoorn.com
AIM:
Sid Barnhoorn
MSN:
sidbarnhoorn@hotmail.com
Skype:
Sidbarnhoorn
Myspace:
www.myspace.com/sidbarnhoorn
Website:
www.sidbarnhoorn.com

  Re: Overture to the Snow Goose  piargno at 05:38 on 07 March 2007
 

You know, Adler is good, but personally, the best way to learn orchestration is to go to orchestral readings or rehearsals with a score, and each time they run through something, focus on particular families of instruments, and not the score as a whole. If you've got a good memory, then after the reading/rehearsal, you can easily figure out the relationships.

XD

  Re: Overture to the Snow Goose  Pete12b at 12:59 on 09 March 2007
 

Sid, a great piece - especially as your first. As a composer for over twenty years, and lecturing composition for 10, the comments by Mr.McFadyen are shocking. I could hear the bitonailty and different techniques you have tried.
Your approach to orchestration is spot on - orchestration is orchestration - it is the essence of your voice, and will develop and improve with each piece you compose or research. Mr.McFadyen has absolutely NO right to treat you like that.

The sheer bottle of standing up infront of an orchestra is commendable in its own right.

I played your piece to a selection of my students - they would like to hear the rest of it - and all positive comments.
All the very best in all you do.
Mr. McFadyen - know your place! Play nicely.

  Re: Overture to the Snow Goose  Sid Barnhoorn at 11:39 on 15 March 2007
 

Hi Pete,

Thanks you very much for your words. I'm doing a selfstudy in orchestration and various composition techniques at the moment. A few of which I experiment with in filmscores that I do, which is a great way to experiment with them. Meanwhile, I work on my new concertpiece. Drawing up the structure of the piece and making notes of ideas and such as it grows. Also working on the flaws in terms of orchestration and structure that the snow goose has, in my mind. Hope to improve little by little this way. :-)

Thanks for all your comments, people. They help me alot!

Cheers,
Sid

  Re: Overture to the Snow Goose  James McFadyen at 13:16 on 15 March 2007
 

Hi Sid

How do you write you music? I have never been an advocate of writing directly onto the computer, especially for Orchestral works.

I prefer to write by hand, it does take much, much longer but I find it gives me greater control. I think there's too much pressure about hearing how the work sounds before you've conceptualised it.

I also tend to find that there is a greater appreciation for Orchestral technique, especially in the scoring for Strings, where the technique is very different to writing for winds.

  Re: Overture to the Snow Goose  Pete12b at 19:00 on 15 March 2007
 

I totally agree! I know I had a pop at your criticism of Sid's piece but James - if more people wrote just using pencil and paper, firstly it would weed out the wheat from the chaff, and ultimately there is nothing more sexy than a huge sheet of blank manuscript, a sharp pencil and the internalising of the sounds. Sibelius is a great publishing tool, but it isn't for composition. It makes me laugh when you see scores with the melody at the bottom register of a flute accompanied by horns and banks of strings! I know this sounds geeky, but James is right.

Pete.


  Re: Overture to the Snow Goose  scott_good at 20:19 on 15 March 2007
 

guess this is a new thread....

I must confess that i use the computer extensively (but certainly not solely) as a composing tool. I enjoy the ability to play back sections in tempo. I like the ability to be able to slam an idea down very quickly, and then spend time contemplating the results.

My productivity as a composer has grown significantly since I began composing on computer.

I had completed many works by hand before. I had pride in my manuscript - now I am proud of my computer scores.

That being said, I continually hear stories like mentioned by Pete of student composers being duped by the false balances represented on midi playback. However, this is not the mediums fault - it is only a tool - but is the fault of the students lack of knowledge of the medium for which they are composing, and how their tool represents their ideas.

It is always important to consider the implications of using any kinds of tools. I find that composing on computer relates the process of my work more closely with that of sculpture or perhaps painting - I can pick and scrape away at my block of stone - look at it from many angles - scape a bit here, add a bit there. When I did my scores by paper only, it was more like writing a novel - more continuous and train of thought. Once something was down, it had more permanence.

I have no problem scraping huge sections of pieces on computer if they don't feel good after a week or so. + i can save it as a separate file - maybe the seed of my next work, or many years down the road.




This 24 message thread spans 2 pages: [1]  2  > >