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Blog » Self-publishing

20 Nov  

That the internet has revolutionized the consumption of recorded music is a truism.  Artists can self-publish via their own websites or they may circumvent record labels by going directly to download services like iTunes, Amazon or Spotify. This is a trend that has long-since spread to more commercial forms of sheet music on websites such as musicnotes.com.

Composers of contemporary classical music, however, just don't have the profile to promote their music simply by putting it on their website. For this reason most would prefer to win a traditional publishing contract, leaving the sales and promotion to someone else. Failing this, however, the iTunes model does have much to recommend it; a composer may make his or her music available in a place that already receives 'footfall', without having to have it accepted by an intermediary. So what are the options for composers seeking to make their music available in this way?

Sheetmusicplus.com

Perhaps the biggest player to enter this field is Sheet Music Plus. They already have many thousands of sheet music buyers and recently opened their website to self-publishing composers. All the detail is laid out, here. The bottom line is that participating musicians earn royalties of 45% of the list price of their sheet music once their account reaches a $20 minimum. Composers retain the rights to their music; I spoke to a representative, who said: 'the composer has full control over his or her piece. They can choose to sell on our site and then work with any other organization and or publishers to sell it through them. And if for any reason they need to stop selling a title on our site, they just click 'delete' in the Manage Title section and the piece will be removed...within seven business days.'

Arcomis.com

I interviewed the director of Arcomis, Adrian Hull, on this website some time ago. They specialize in connecting the general public to the arts by helping with the commissioning process. They are particularly expert in the field of contemporary music, the director himself being a composer and director of the London Contemporary Music Group. They offer a similar self-publishing service as Sheet Music Plus. Whilst submission of scores is currently free there may, however, be a small submission charge in future. Composers earn a royalty of 50% of any profits they make once their account reaches £25. Like Sheet Music Plus, a composer retains complete control over his or her music. Whilst these terms are similar, it should also be noted that Arcomis scores are proofed by professional copyists before being published online. Arcomis also promote their catalogue to arts organizations and though their Arcomis Live concerts. Their International Flute Event, for example, attracted some of the world's best players, resulting in broadcasts on Radio 3 and a spin-off flute album.

Composers Edition

Composers Edition is a newer enterprise that will concentrate solely on providing editions of contemporary music. The store of composers' music is not, as yet, live. Composers will receive a profile and each work will be presented in its own web page with details such as forces, duration and programme notes. Like Arcomis and Sheet Music Plus the composer retains complete control of the music. The site will make versions of the works available in both print and downloadable versions, but on terms that make it seem that they have failed to do their market research: 'The composer get [sic] a return of 20% of the UK retail price on printed document sales and 30% of the UK retail price on digital download sales.' This looks mean set alongside the other two services, especially considering that scores are not even proofread before being published on the site. They also do not, as yet, have the promotional track record of a better-established organization like Arcomis. Despite these facts, and a whooping quarterly subscription fee of £75 (two of which are due at registration!), I happen to know that the service has received some interest from composers. So it might still be one to watch.

Also worth considering

Score Exchange is the successor to the now defunct SibeliusMusic.com, which was a self-publishing site for composers solely using Sibelius software. For a limited time they are allowing users of the old site to transfer all their music to the new one. Publishing works on the site is free, whilst the composer receives 30% of the sale price, as well as retaining complete control over their works.

For composers looking for maximum exposure and who don't care at all about making money or promotional issues, IMSLP hosts a growing range of contemporary composers' works. The submission process is outlined in their FAQ.

 


 



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COMMENTS



 Nicolas Tzortzis commenting on Self-publishing:
21 November 2012 at 14:31

Congratulations on your article.
it is worth mentioning
http://www.babelscores.com
a site where young composers can promote and sell their scores
many of the brightest young talents are to be found there.



 Christian Morris commenting on Self-publishing:
24 November 2012 at 12:07

Ah, thanks Nicolas. I was always likely to miss something, so hoped that others would chip in with other places. That looks a very interesting and useful site. Thanks!



 Christian Morris commenting on Self-publishing:
07 December 2012 at 13:16

Please note two corrections have been incorporated into this article since first publication.

At the request of Arcomis I have changed the description of their service to include:

1. Submission of scores currently free, rather than charged for as originally stated.
2. Royalties are 50% rather than 40%.

Which is good news all round for those interested in their service!



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